Tag: Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators

Plot, structure, death, death and more death

Plot, structure, death, death and more death

[ 0 ] February 21, 2016 |

I’m fixated on plot and structure at the moment – you may be, too, if you’re a writer tackling revisions on a work in progress or a NaNoWriMo draft from last year.

This year, for the first time, I’m editing a manuscript that I’ve left for a long, long rest. I wrote it more than a year ago. I’ve never let a first draft sit for so long before.

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How I got my agent and what nearly stopped me

How I got my agent and what nearly stopped me

[ 32 ] December 30, 2015 |

I’ve vacillated about whether to record this journey, as it may be the most personal thing I’ve written yet, but all things considered, I think it’s best to capture the story of how I signed with a literary agent, and the fear that almost stopped me.

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Your manuscript: build the world and let it go

Your manuscript: build the world and let it go

[ 5 ] July 16, 2015 |

I’m girding my loins for something many of my SCBWI friends already know well: the ordeal of submitting a finished manuscript to childrens’ literary agents. I’ve been here before, including with an early draft of the not-bad-but-could-be-more-sparkly science fiction novel I’m about to do the rounds with again. That experience last autumn was an eye-opener […]

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How to get the best from a critique

How to get the best from a critique

[ 6 ] October 1, 2014 |

Critiquing is never comfortable for a writer. Your ego and your dreams for the manuscript are on the line when you pass your work-in-progress to another person and ask for constructive feedback. But it’s a necessary evil – and, if you think about it, it’s not evil at all. Critiques are the route to making your story as clear and compelling as it can be. And that’s what you want, right?

‘Getting the best from critiques’” was the topic of our teach-in here at SCBWI Southeast Scotland on 27 September in Edinburgh. Click here to read the tips we swapped.

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Can 36 primary school children write a story together?

Can 36 primary school children write a story together?

[ 0 ] March 26, 2014 |

Our local primary school asked me to come in on World Book Day and work with nine classes, from ages 4 through 12, writing a whole-school story. Here’s what happened.

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Barry Cunningham’s tips on strong beginnings in children’s books

Barry Cunningham’s tips on strong beginnings in children’s books

[ 0 ] March 19, 2014 |

Here’s a summary of an exclusive Twitter chat hosted by SCBWI British Isles with Barry Cunningham of Chicken House, answering writers’ questions on what makes a strong chapter 1 in a children’s book.

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How to write strong dialogue in children’s books

How to write strong dialogue in children’s books

[ 6 ] February 17, 2014 |

Thanks again everybody for coming along to our SCBWI British Isles teach-in on 1 February at Edinburgh’s Central Library, looking at how to write strong dialogue in children’s books. Below are the collected tips shared by the group, and notice of Strong Beginnings: our first writer’s craft intensive on 29 March, hosted by Keith Gray. Read on!

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20 tips on writing vivid characters from SCBWI SE Scotland teach-in

20 tips on writing vivid characters from SCBWI SE Scotland teach-in

[ 1 ] December 15, 2013 |

SCBWI Southeast Scotland had our second successful teach-in at the Edinburgh Central Library this weekend, and we were delighted to welcome 17 attendees in total. If you’re writing a children’s book or you’re an illustrator wanting to get into picture books, you’re welcome to come along and find out what we’re all about.

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Psst, are you writing a children’s book? Meet SCBWI

Psst, are you writing a children’s book? Meet SCBWI

[ 4 ] March 26, 2013 |

Eight years ago, I wrote a children’s book, but I didn’t get my happy ending. I shopped it around to a few literary agents, had my confidence punctured by two rejections in quick succession, and put away my dreams (and the unfinished sequel) while I got on with family life. Eight months ago, I jump-started […]

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